“But man is not made for defeat,”

he said. “A man can be destroyed but not defeated. ” Ernest Hemingway

Lately Hemingway and I have been crossing paths… not him- his writings. I struggle with the fact that I understand it on a very deep level. Specifically TOMATS. It just pisses me off he turned to alcohol to treat the weight he carried mentally, which IMHO led to ultimate suicide. As he aged his writing became so comparative to what challenges we all face.  Setting all politics aside which is often difficult when reading a great piece of literature or listening to music can often be hard. But appreciating the beauty of the written word so passionate, I can only be appreciative.♥

“He remembered the time he had hooked one of a pair of marlin. The male fish always let the female fish feed first and the hooked fish, the female, made a wild, panic-stricken, despairing fight that soon exhausted her, and all the time the male had stayed with her, crossing the line and circling with her on the surface. He had stayed so close that the old man was afraid he would cut the line with his tail which was sharp as a scythe and almost of that size and shape. When the old man had gaffed her and clubbed her, holding the rapier bill with its sandpaper edge and clubbing her across the top of her head until her colour turned to a colour almost like the backing of mirrors, and then, with the boy’s aid, hoisted her aboard, the male fish had stayed by the side of the boat. Then, while the old man was clearing the lines and preparing the harpoon, the male fish jumped high into the air beside the boat to see where the female was and then went down deep, his lavender wings, that were his pectoral fins, spread wide and all his wide lavender stripes showing. He was beautiful, the old man remembered, and he had stayed.” The Old Man and the Sea- Ernest Hemingway

If you’re into old gear Langs is having it’s auction this weekend…

http://www.langsauction.com/

orvis old flies

I am not sure who wrote this but it was sent to me via email and thought it worthy to share:

There once was a young boy with a very bad temper. The boy’s father wanted to teach him a lesson, so he gave him a bag of nails and told him that every time he lost his temper he must hammer a nail into their wooden fence.

On the first day of this lesson, the little boy had driven 37 nails into the fence. He was really mad!

Over the course of the next few weeks, the little boy began to control his temper, so the number of nails that were hammered into the fence dramatically decreased.

It wasn’t long before the little boy discovered it was easier to hold his temper than to drive those nails into the fence.

Then, the day finally came when the little boy didn’t lose his temper even once, and he became so proud of himself, he couldn’t wait to tell his father.

Pleased, his father suggested that he now pull out one nail for each day that he could hold his temper.

Several weeks went by and the day finally came when the young boy was able to tell his father that all the nails were gone.

Very gently, the father took his son by the hand and led him to the fence.

“You have done very well, my son,” he smiled, “but look at the holes in the fence. The fence will never be the same.”

The little boy listened carefully as his father continued to speak.

“When you say things in anger, they leave permanent scars just like these. And no matter how many times you say you’re sorry, the wounds will still be there.”

fruit2

The tiny, rock-hard fruits of Pollia condensata, a wild plant that grows in the forests of Ethiopia, Mozambique, Tanzania and other African countries, can’t be eaten raw, cooked or turned into a beverage. In Western Uganda and elsewhere, though, the plant’s small metallic fruits have long been used for decorative purposes because of an unusual property: They stay a vibrant blue color for years or even decades after they’ve been picked. A specimen at the Kew Botanical Gardens in London that was gathered in Ghana in 1974 still retains its iridescent hue.

Intrigued, a team of researchers from Kew, the University of Cambridge and the Smithsonian Natural History Museum decided to look into how this plant produces such a dazzling and persistent color. When they attempted to extract a pigment to study, though, they were surprised to discover the fruit had none.

When they examined P. condensata on a cellular level, they realized that the fruit produces its characteristic color through structural coloration, a radically different phenomenon that is well-documented in the animal kingdom but virtually unknown in plants. They determined that the fruit’s tissue is more intensely colored than any previously studied biological tissue—reflecting 30 percent of light, as compared to a silver mirror, making it more intense than even the renowned color of a Morpho butterfly’s wings. Their findings were revealed in a new study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

fruit

Pollia condensata, native to Africa, uses nanoscale-sized structures to produce the most intense color ever studied in biological tissue. Image via PNAS

Read more: http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/science/2012/09/this-african-fruit-produces-the-worlds-most-intense-natural-color/#ixzz2TkAja0pq

Have a great week everyone! Hope opening day for flounder was a great success! I know a few people got real lucky 😉

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Funny when someone just gets it…  all the pain and hurt you have inside for so long. All at once it is accepted into the universe of mutual understanding. Without a shared word and only silence.

Life.

When it comes knocking, never refuse the sun to walk through your door.

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